afloydianslip:

afriet:

John F. Kennedy on civil rights

And people wonder why he was shot. Over 50 years later and he’s still ahead of his time.

(via cognitivedissonance)

If you put your politicians up for sale, as the US does (alone in this among industrialized democracies), then someone will buy them—and it won’t be you; you can’t afford them.

Juan Cole (via politicalprof)

What politicalprof is alluding to, is that most countries (including a great number of developing countries) use public financing for elections, and restrict private funding. That is, parties are given X dollars (based on various formulae) to spend, and can spend only that. In many other instances, laws require all parties/candidate to have equal access to media time (often during prime time) on airwaves (which are considered “public space”—which they also are in the US, btw).

Then, again, most countries highly value elections and the democratic process. For example, most countries make it very easy for people to vote: They schedule elections on weekends (usually Sundays) and make them national holidays, so that people will not have to balance work and other weekday responsibilities (like taking kids to/from school) with finding time to go vote.

But, hey, why should we make it easy for the poor and those who work and raise families to vote? It’s so much easier to just let our economic betters decide for us. After all, prior to the 1800s, that was the norm throughout human existence.

(via pol102)

(via pol102)

We should think deeply upon the fact that the Nazi blitzkriegs were waged by baptized soldiers. Had the church held to pre -Constantine convictions, Hitler would never have gotten off the ground. Before we appeal to Hitler as the ultimate argument against Christian nonviolence, we first have to ask how Hitler was able to amass a following of Christians in the first place. After all, it wasn’t atheists and pagans who formed the German Christian movement that lent support to Hitler in the 1930s. Brian Zahnd (via azspot)

(via azspot)

theeconomist:

Tomorrow’s cover, today
By fostering a personality cult and by dominating the party and the government, Xi Jinping has become China’s most powerful leader for a long time—certainly since Deng, and maybe since Mao. Our cover leader argues that his rise has profound implications for the country

theeconomist:

Tomorrow’s cover, today

By fostering a personality cult and by dominating the party and the government, Xi Jinping has become China’s most powerful leader for a long time—certainly since Deng, and maybe since Mao. Our cover leader argues that his rise has profound implications for the country

patrickthomson:

the most optimistic letter that any human has ever written

patrickthomson:

the most optimistic letter that any human has ever written

(via retrocampaigns)

ca-thar-si-s:

tsparks:

Undulatus Asperatus clouds over Lincoln NE on July 7, 2014
link

What a trip.

ca-thar-si-s:

tsparks:

Undulatus Asperatus clouds over Lincoln NE on July 7, 2014

link

What a trip.

killsbillions:

Friday I be like….

killsbillions:

Friday I be like….

I’m glad I did it, partly because it was worth it, but mostly because I shall never have to do it again. — Mark Twain (via politicalprof)
I want to live in a world where a chicken can cross the road without anybody questioning its motives. Neil deGrasse Tyson (via prettayprettaygood)
…ISIL speaks for no religion. Their victims are overwhelmingly Muslim, and no faith teaches people to massacre innocents. No just God would stand for what they did yesterday and what they do every single day. — President Obama’s remarks on the beheading of journalist James Foley. (via thepoliticalnotebook)